Tag Archives: ulcer guard

New Concerns Have Sprung

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Chance greeting me as I drive up

The days are finally feeling like spring!  The grass is green, the blankets put away, the sun is shining, and the horses are shedding.

Chance is continuing to gain weight, although as I said in the previous post, he still needs to put on a good 50-75 lbs.  As the days continue to get warmer, Chance’s arthritis seems to become more manageable for him; his stride is longer and he runs around (mostly after Lucky) more frequently.

Unfortunately, when the farrier came out about two weeks ago Chance was too stiff to get his back right shoe on. The farrier decided to come back out to try and re-shoe him and, during that time in between, Chance must have tweaked it…AGAIN! 

 While Chance did not have a shoe on his back right I kept it wrapped to provide some protection and also even out all of his hooves.  However, when I arrived I noticed that Chance was significantly twisting his back right leg inward at the walk & it had some swelling.  The swelling was not horrible but it was noticeable. I cold hosed his leg for about 45 minutes while I groomed him & gave him a dose of Equinox (pain medication) and Ulcer Guard.  I put on his back leg wrap to help with reducing the swelling and provide some extra support.  Chance did his neck stretches effortlessly and was baring weight on his back hind. 

But as I was grooming him I noticed, on the left side his chest, he had patches of hair loss and dandruff.  The area did not look red or inflamed, nor did it seem itchy or painful.  So I continued grooming him and decided to put a call into the vet to come and check his leg and the hair loss.

Of course, I turned to Google to try and find out what exactly could be the cause of the patches of hair loss.

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According to a handful of sources, there are a few possibilities for hair loss- mites or Lice, a vitamin deficiency, rain rot or crud, or even just his natural shedding tendency. A skin scrape would help to confirm what may be the cause. 

 As for the swelling of Chance’s back right leg, I decided to call our previous vet who collected and injected Chance’s DDFT with stem cells to heal the hole in his tendon. We have some stem cells left over and I wanted to see if injecting his leg again would be of any benefit.  I also would like to get an ultrasound recheck to ensure that there is not another injury to his DDFT tendon sheath again.

The twisting of his back hind leg is worrisome as well.  

Everything I have read about EPM states that horses can have a relapse in symptoms after treatment is complete. My concern is that the twisting are due to the neurological symptoms coming back since Chance’s EPM treatment has been finished for a little over two weeks…. 

 Our current vet believes that Chance’s ataxia and twisting is not due to EPM but his cervical spine instead.  Could the twisting be worse due to the swelling of his hind leg?  Or is the swelling and the twisting two separate issues all together?

Our Regiment


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Chance receives the following:



AM:

1. Protazil 50mls

2. Vitamin E 4 scoops (Watch for loose stools.  This would indicate that his VitE should be cut down)

PM:

1. SmartPak: Immune Boost

2. SmartPak: Senior Flex

3. Equinyl 2 scoops first two weeks, 1 scoop after

OTHER:

If Chance’s symptoms are worse, he can receive Equinox and UlcerGuard.

How to we get there?

As I said previously, the idea of Chance collapsing and no one being there terrifies me. Vet4 is shipping me the Protazil and I am trying to find another vet to come and administer the DMSO before beginning treatment.  DMSO typically helps the Protazil adhere better, thus making the treatment more effective.

EPM: Is DMSO the Cure for Treatment Issues?

By Stacey Oke, DVM, MSc Aug 3, 2009

New research on treating horses with equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) has found dissolving toltrazuril sulfone, commercially known as ponazuril, in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) instead of water prior to oral administration in horses increases the bioavailability by three times and achieves therapeutic levels in both the blood and cerebrospinal fluid.
Ponazuril and related triazine-based antiprotozoal agents used to treat horses with EPM are highly lipid (fat) soluble. As a result, these agents dissolve poorly in the gastrointestinal systemand are therefore poorly absorbed.
Poor drug absorption results in variable drug concentrations in the bloodstream, which translates into a variable therapeutic effect in the treated horse, explained Levent Dirikolu, DVM, PhD, from the Department of Veterinary Biosciences at the University of Illinois, and co-researchers from the University of Kentucky Gluck Equine Research Center and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Animal and Natural resources Institute.

I finally found a vet who was able to come to the farm to meet Chance and administer other medications.

Vet6 felt that DMSO wasn’t necessary and that Chance would be fine. I called Vet4, explained the situation, and he advised beginning Chance on 1/2 a dose of Protazil for the first couple days in conjunction with a mild anti-inflammatory.

So, that is what we did. I had also read that Vit E (only in its all natural form) was helpful during treatment, along with Ulcer Guard to keep his stomach safe from the medications.

I called 5 different vets and no one has what I was looking for in stock. I finally found it in Chantilly!