Tag Archives: vet

Spotting Lameness: The Game Plan

Spotting Lameness: The Game Plan
— Read on horsenetwork.com/2018/10/spotting-lameness-game-plan/

Core Vaccination: Protecting Horses From 5 Deadly Diseases – The Horse

Learn about the diseases veterinarians recommend protecting your horse against and how vaccination could save your horse’s life.
— Read on thehorse.com/features/core-vaccination-protecting-horses-from-5-deadly-diseases/

When it rains…

ker.com/equinews/white-line-disease-requires-early-diagnosis-and-aggressive-treatment/

Dealing With Equine Colic: Here are 33 Do’s and Don’ts – The Horse

What should you do (or not do) if your horse shows signs of colic? And how do you prevent colic in the first place? Find out from our veterinary experts.
— Read on thehorse.com/features/dealing-with-equine-colic/

Gator Rubs

Chance was not acting like himself near the end of the snow storm.  He seemed lethargic and gloomy…his appetite was good but the light in his eyes was not as strong.

I called the vet and asked her to please come out. She came out that day and ran a CBC along with going some acupuncture and chiropractic adjustments.  The vet also gave Chance B12 (or as our previous vet called “the old man shot”).

She contacted me after seeing Chance and informed me that she was diagnosing him with an ulcer and thinks that he may have either slipped on the snow and hurt (bruised) his hip or hurt it while rolling.

I asked about the diagnostics that lead to the ulcer diagnosis.  She explained that with horses there are 7 “acupuncture points”.  When they are all reactive 85% of the time the horse has a gastric ulcer. She also went on to explain that with the lethargy and the change in patterns due to the snow a gastric ulcer would be plausible.   They are apparently common when there are changes in the horse’s routine and fairly easy to cure.   She prescribed “Nux” (give 1 teaspoon until gone) and Ranitidine.

I am suppose to let her know if he stops eating or becomes more lethargic.  She felt that he was not at risk for colic because he is eating well and on a high quality feed.  Fingers crossed.

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Resources on Gastric Ulcers and Prescribed Medications



Gastric Ulcers in Horses

Ranitidine

Nux Vomica Herbal Medicine

Pump, Pump, Pump It Up!

The vet came out to give Chance and Lucky their fall shots and do some follow up acupuncture on Chance.  The vet said that Chance has increased flexibility especially in his cervical spine and has gained weight and muscle mass!!!!!!

His feeding regiment is as follows:

AM:

  1. 6 quarts of Nutrina Safe Choice Senior Feed
  2. 3 quarts hay stretcher
  3. Alfalfa hay mix (as much as he wants through out the day)

PM:

  1. 6 quarts of Nutrina Safe Choice Senior Feed
  2. 3 quarts hay stretcher
  3. Alfalfa hay mix (as much as he wants through out the day)
  4. 1 Scoops of DuraLactin (Natural anti-inflammatory and pain supplement)
  5. 1 SmartPak (Senior Flex, Immune Boost)

He is out all day when it is cool and all night when it is hot during the day. So he has tons of green grass to eat.  He walks constantly- up and down the hills- and runs around with Lucky.  We also walk ground poles and do stretches and massage every time I come out to the barn.

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We still need to continue upping his weight and muscle mass preferably before winter.  Fingers crossed.

Save

The Luckiest Unlucky Day Ever

Today was not the greatest of days….but I will say that we had the luckiest unlucky day ever!  And, of course, it was a full moon tonight which means I should just stay inside.

Today we met with a new farrier.  I have been doing some research on shoes that provide comfort, support, and do not mess up Chance’s hooves like nails tend to especially when a horse is on rockier terrain.  I spoke with my vet who suggested to,   “put shoes on all 4 hooves with a 1 degree wedge pad on both hind shoes.  Set all 4 shoes back from the toe of the foot by at least a 1/4th an inch.”

I went to the farm a bit early and gave Chance a bath, some Equinox for pain, and got ready for the farrier.  The farrier arrived and Chance was great!  He stood on the cross ties and ate hay like a champ.  For some reason I decided to lengthen the cross ties.  I am not sure why exactly but thank God I did.

My dad and the farrier were with Chance while I went to feed Lucky his dinner.  Well, after I fed Luck, I turned the corner and saw that Chance was on the ground!  Yes, you read correctly, he was on the freaking ground…all 17.1 hands of him!  The moment I saw him our eyes met- I know it sounds like the beginning of a love story- and he immediately took a deep breath and calmed down.  I walked up to him and he slowly got up and stood there right in front of me with his head resting under my arm- breathing heavily and he had the beginnings of sweat covering his body.

I stood there and just spoke to him- calmly- telling him he was okay.  Once a few minutes had passed, and he was calm, I walked him forward to make sure he was okay.  Sure enough, he was fine…aside from some surface scrapes.  I cleaned his scrapes up and walked him outside to eat some grass.  After about ten minutes, I walked him back into the aisle for the farrier to finish up.

According to both my dad and the farrier, Chance was having his back left shoe nailed in when the nail hit a nerve and he flinched.  I guess the farrier didn’t realize this because he hit the nail once more.  That was when Chance reacted and went down.  Thankfully, the farrier got out of the way & removed the nail midair (so that Chance wouldn’t go down on the foot with the nail and drive it deeper).  Think of a splinter going under your nail…and then hitting it again, deeper under your nail….ouch!

However, he landed somewhat gracefully, but due to the cross ties not being break away and the concrete not allowing Chance to gain any “grip” with his newly shod feet, he began to panic.  Upon seeing me, he calmed down, and he was able to get back up.  I can’t help but thank my lucky stars that I had lengthened the cross ties so that he had some slack, and that I came back inside when I did…had I not, he would have kept flailing.  Had I been in there when the nail hit the nerve it may not have happened because I would have said something to the farrier.  However, had I been in there when it occurred, things may have also been far worse…since my dog, Sadie, is always right by Chance’s or my side at all times.

We ended up deciding to forgo putting hind shoes on until later (a few weeks) and the farrier removed the one evil hind shoe and trimmed up the other hoof.  Chance stood quietly and allowed him to complete his job.  I was so impressed with my old guy!

I have emailed my vet to see if she is able to come check on Chance tomorrow just in case…hopefully, Chance will just be a bit sore in the morning and nothing worse….:(

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The Call

One day I received a call that I needed to come out and see Chance because he wasn’t doing well and, according to Vet1, he needed to be put down.  I quickly canceled my appointments and got on the road.  The 4 hour drive was excruciating…once we finally arrived, my heart broke.

My old guy was skin and bones.  His back right leg was swollen and he wasn’t able to bare weight on it.  His eyes were dull.  He could barely walk, and when he did, he wouldn’t put any weight on the right hind.  There were even times when he would do this “neurologic dance” (coined by the farm’s owner and C’s other mom) where he would lift up his back right leg and hop!

But when he saw me pull up, he whinnied.  He was excited to see me.  He ate the pureed carrots but refused the apple puree (only my mom would make this for him).  He wasn’t ready to die.



I called the vet who said that Chance should be put down to see what his thoughts were.

Me:   What do you think is going on with C?

Vet1: I think he is ready to be put down. 

Me: Because of what?

Vet1: Lymphangitis

Me: Okay, well, what is the cause of the Lymphangitis? Did you run any diagnostics?

Vet1: No

Me:  I would like to manage his pain and run a few tests before making that decision.  (I reviewed the research that I had done and asked where to go from there.) Could it be EPM?

Vet1: “It’s not EPM”

Me: How about Cushings? Or Laminitis? Lymes?

Vet1: Nope. Just old age.

Me: The journals I read said that some of the symptoms…(I was cut off)

Vet1: “I don’t care what journals you read!  It’s a bunch of…”

Me: One was from VA Tech actually…



Well, that was that! Vet1 did not completely lack compassion but he was more “old school” I guess one could say.  He was well respected in the horse world and up until this point, he did the job I needed. But I will say I was disheartened by our conversation.  

I decided to contact the other vets that I had worked with in the past, who also knew Chance, and get second, third, fourth opinions.  

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